Song Analysis Worksheet

Below is the tool provided to you to help you begin to process how you will perform your music. 


Voice Studio of Mark Crayton

VOI 211 through 414

VOI 201 - 303

Instructor:  Mark Crayton


Song Analysis Work Sheet



1. Title of piece:______________________________________________________



2. If your piece is from a major work (opera, oratorio, song cycle), name the work:


________________________________________________________________



3. Composer:_______________________________________________________

NameDates    Period of History



4. Other works by this composer:

________________________________________________________________


________________________________________________________________


________________________________________________________________



5. Does the piece have some other specific significance (written for special occasion, in honor of someone)?: 


________________________________________________________________


________________________________________________________________



6. Author of text/poem:________________________________________________



7. Key / Tonal Center (Please include all changes of Tonal Center as well):



________________________________________________________________





8. Identify the chord, tonal center shift, place in the music where the emotion changes. Does the text change as well? 


________________________________________________________________


________________________________________________________________



9. Tempo marking:___________________________________________________



10. Character who sings this piece, if applicable:_____________________________



11. Character and Scenario: (Note: If you are singing an art song and you are not a specific character, you must develop one. Use your imagination, reading the text, “reading between the lines.”) Ask yourself these questions and write down your answers.


A. Who are you?________________________________________________


B. Where are you? (if there is not a specific location indicated in the text, you must decide where you are; a field, a room, on a mountain, on a beach, etc.)


___________________________________________________________


C. Are you alone or with someone? Does that person(s) know you are there? 


___________________________________________________________


D. Are you involved in the action or are you a narrator? 


___________________________________________________________


E. What is your approximate age?


___________________________________________________________


F. What are you feeling (anger, happiness, frustration, sadness, loneliness)? 


___________________________________________________________



G. Do your feelings change during the piece?


___________________________________________________________


H.   If your feelings change, why do they change? 


___________________________________________________________



I. Do your circumstances change during the piece?


___________________________________________________________

 


11. Translation: 


A. On a separate piece of paper or on the back of this paper, write the text   in the original language and then the correct word-for-word translation underneath. Above the text, transcribe the words using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). Other sources that give the IPA transcription may be used (e.g., Phonetic readings of songs and arias.  MT883 .C63). Use a dictionary to look up words even if you have a word-for-word translation. Place the translation above or below the text in your music. Add the IPA transcription above or below the text to insure correct pronunciation while practicing.  


B. Write the text in present-day language, even slang.


12. Write text (off book) in poem form and read it dramatically. Practice by reading  it to someone or by reading it in front of a mirror. Watch for natural expressions and gestures. Try to remember the feeling that created the most natural expressions and gestures. Try to eliminate all gestures and expressions that look artificial. Be prepared to declaim it as a poem in your lesson.











© Mark Crayton 2014